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Thread: Do you want to know the ideal career for INTP.

  1. #21
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    Portrait of the Architect (INTP)

    ww.keirsey.com/4temps/architect.asp

    Architects need not be thought of as only interested in drawing blueprints for buildings or roads or bridges. They are the master designers of all kinds of theoretical systems, including school curricula, corporate strategies, and new technologies. For Architects, the world exists primarily to be analyzed, understood, explained - and re-designed. External reality in itself is unimportant, little more than raw material to be organized into structural models. What is important for Architects is that they grasp fundamental principles and natural laws, and that their designs are elegant, that is, efficient and coherent.

    Architects are rare - maybe one percent of the population - and show the greatest precision in thought and speech of all the types. They tend to see distinctions and inconsistencies instantaneously, and can detect contradictions no matter when or where they were made. It is difficult for an Architect to listen to nonsense, even in a casual conversation, without pointing out the speaker's error. And in any serious discussion or debate Architects are devastating, their skill in framing arguments giving them an enormous advantage. Architects regard all discussions as a search for understanding, and believe their function is to eliminate inconsistencies, which can make communication with them an uncomfortable experience for many.

    Ruthless pragmatists about ideas, and insatiably curious, Architects are driven to find the most efficient means to their ends, and they will learn in any manner and degree they can. They will listen to amateurs if their ideas are useful, and will ignore the experts if theirs are not. Authority derived from office, credential, or celebrity does not impress them. Architects are interested only in what make sense, and thus only statements that are consistent and coherent carry any weight with them.
    Architects often seem difficult to know. They are inclined to be shy except with close friends, and their reserve is difficult to penetrate. Able to concentrate better than any other type, they prefer to work quietly at their computers or drafting tables, and often alone. Architects also become obsessed with analysis, and this can seem to shut others out. Once caught up in a thought process, Architects close off and persevere until they comprehend the issue in all its complexity. Architects prize intelligence, and with their grand desire to grasp the structure of the universe, they can seem arrogant and may show impatience with others who have less ability, or who are less driven.

  2. #22
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    INTP portrait

    Albert Einstein


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  3. #23
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    Einsteins career also supports my supposition I think. I once had pretensions of being a gravity physicist so happen to have closely studied Einstein's life and original papers. If you think about it he did all his real work during the patent office days. Recap; after an unspectacular graduation from school he worked at a Patent Office where he had to process applications for a few hours a day, which then gave him plenty of time to develop four seminal papers on the photoelectric effect, special relativity, brownian motion and matter/energy equivalence (E=mc^2). This was so amazing that they're known as the Annus Mirabulus papers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annus_Mirabilis_papers).

    Now look at his career after that. Extraordinary fame, Nobel prize for the photoelectric effect (which helped lead to the development of quantum mechanics), and he ends up in America peripherally working on the Atomic bomb and situated at the Institute for Advanced Study. I'd argue his career was essentially done at that point. His name made it on some important work, but notice it's as a coauthor, essentially piggbacking on their work (Bose Einstein condensate, Einstein Poldasky Rosen effect, etc). Now you could say that he had certainly done enough at that point in his life, or that he was getting older and usually people do their best work when their young, etc. All true, but I suspect that also going to the IAS and spending the rest of his time searching for a unified field theory was an example of an INTP diving into his belly button, and he would have done better had he taught at a college and/or retained some other responsibilities (he was divorced and didn't even have a family to worry about)

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by composer View Post
    Einsteins career also supports my supposition I think. I once had pretensions of being a gravity physicist so happen to have closely studied Einstein's life and original papers. If you think about it he did all his real work during the patent office days. Recap; after an unspectacular graduation from school he worked at a Patent Office where he had to process applications for a few hours a day, which then gave him plenty of time to develop four seminal papers on the photoelectric effect, special relativity, brownian motion and matter/energy equivalence (E=mc^2). This was so amazing that they're known as the Annus Mirabulus papers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annus_Mirabilis_papers).

    Now look at his career after that. Extraordinary fame, Nobel prize for the photoelectric effect (which helped lead to the development of quantum mechanics), and he ends up in America peripherally working on the Atomic bomb and situated at the Institute for Advanced Study. I'd argue his career was essentially done at that point. His name made it on some important work, but notice it's as a coauthor, essentially piggbacking on their work (Bose Einstein condensate, Einstein Poldasky Rosen effect, etc). Now you could say that he had certainly done enough at that point in his life, or that he was getting older and usually people do their best work when their young, etc. All true, but I suspect that also going to the IAS and [I]spending the rest of his time searching for a unified field theory was an example of an INTP diving into his belly button[/I], and he would have done better had he taught at a college and/or retained some other responsibilities (he was divorced and didn't even have a family to worry about)
    I agree with

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Designer View Post
    Thinkers always think about justice.
    FALSE.
    Quote Originally Posted by The Designer View Post
    if you look into the pictures of thinkers and how do they look like you understand me
    elaborate!
    Quote Originally Posted by The Designer View Post
    thinking is a gift from the creator
    how on earth could limited human's mind even talk about the creator?!
    Quote Originally Posted by The Designer View Post
    and you have to use it to serve the humanity.
    feelers take the responsibility but they don't have to.
    This is exactly what you want to do - get paid for being smart, not useful. Tools are useful. Don't be a tool!

  6. #26
    Senior Member Array UniversalMagnetism's Avatar
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    So am I the only one that thinks arms dealer or assassin would be 'ideal'?

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    ^^ It's only ideal if you always think about justice while you're doing it.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by UniversalMagnetism View Post
    So am I the only one that thinks arms dealer or assassin would be 'ideal'?
    yes

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tenderfoot View Post
    ^^ It's only ideal if you always think about justice while you're doing it.
    I would think that since Jung divided the psyche into feeling/thinking and intuition/sensing and said that the ego is the focus that wants to separate itself from the unconscious that doing these jobs without justice in mind would make them ideal. What I mean is that everybody has their reasons for doing what they do and make their own choices and the INTP that let's others make their own choices while also making its own would have a more actualized ego.

    Arms dealer is a neutral philosophy that puts power into another person's hands. But the arms dealer does not make them pull the trigger. The weight of morality is left to the individual to decide (my favorite way to approach morality).

    An assassin recognizes that justice is an idea relative to what certain people value for such. By considering the act of killing to initially be an act of justice, then the assassin can easily make their own choices about who they will assassinate and why and there is no philosophical problem with doing so because it again comes down to choice. Nothing is then personal, but instead the act of a strong will desiring to assert itself involved in challenges to do so and is above the idea of justice. (I might not have explained this one well)

    So I'm wondering what is the philosophical motivation for these other careers mentioned to be ideal for the INTP?

  10. #30
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    I'm not so sure I would believe how well MBTI translates into career... I think it has much more to do with preference/taste/enjoyment. For instance, I don't really like the idea of working for anybody, or the concept of a "career"...so many of the prescribed occupations are immediately out the window. I also lean more towards academic/creative pursuits than I do the bus/gov/practical occupational world, and I have adjusted what I do accordingly. I enjoy most of the humanities more than I do anything to do with engineering/accounting/science career paths. The exception would be math/computer science, but only mostly in their pure forms, and more akin to logic as it relates back to philosophy, certainly not most "IT job roles" or "actuarial/accounting" type roles. While it is relatively easy for me, I view most of the practical aspects of it as pure drudgery.
    I am much more interested with things relating to philosophy/literature as a starting point, then moving on from there into possible "Career paths"
    I do not really agree with the keirsey "architect" description above, there are much better ones to be found that describe the more artistically inclined or academically inclined INTP's better. They tend to expand on the best with "thought and speech" notions...while the one above mentions it, then rambles on about computers and drafting tables. A lot of what is mentioned in that description is actually quite borderline INTJ, akin to just going on notions of the "NT" then expanding and throwing in a few quips.
    Furthermore the description is certainly not for an INTP understanding themselves, but obviously written for an outsider to possibly understand an INTP shell.

    Here is a perfect description, or at least the best I have seen of the type which I am referring to:

    "The applied sciences, for instance, often require a great deal of precision, patience, and perseverance, all of which seem to fetter the INTP’s creative instincts. On the other hand, the arts may seem too subjective to adequately satisfy their penchant for articulating objective truths. For this reason, this variety of INTP will often gravitate toward philosophy, the social sciences, or the humanities, which allow for the employment of both the creative and rational aspects of their personality" - Drenth

    This expands on that notion, and is part of the reason I have shied away from many of the suggested " career paths " which people tend to recommend.

    "In general, INTPs abhor work settings that are overly structured, encumbered with an inordinate number of rules and strictures. Such environments butt-up against their preference for self-regulation, the desire to act freely according to their own whims and dictates. This can at times make finding satisfying work rather difficult, perhaps explaining why INTPs, in concert with INFPs, tend to report the lowest degree of job satisfaction of all types. In a word, INTPs are restless, constantly searching for their niche, a place where they can regularly apply their creative or cognitive energies." - Drenth

    That paragraph really kills many of these "ideal career" mumbo jumbo's I see, the ones that are prescribing these careers might understand "NT" fairly well, but I don't think they understand the INTP all too well.

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